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Most Children Younger Than Age 1 are Minorities, Census Bureau Reports
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WASHINGTON, May 17, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The U.S. Census Bureau today released a set of estimates showing that 50.4 percent of our nation's population younger than age 1 were minorities as of July 1, 2011. This is up from 49.5 percent from the 2010 Census taken April 1, 2010. A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.

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The population younger than age 5 was 49.7 percent minority in 2011, up from 49.0 percent in 2010. A population greater than 50 percent minority is considered "majority-minority."

These are the first set of population estimates by race, Hispanic origin, age and sex since the 2010 Census. They examine population change for these groups nationally, as well as within all states and counties, between Census Day (April 1, 2010) and July 1, 2011. Also released were population estimates for Puerto Rico and its municipios by age and sex.

There were 114 million minorities in 2011, or 36.6 percent of the U.S. population. In 2010, it stood at 36.1 percent.

There were five majority-minority states or equivalents in 2011: Hawaii (77.1 percent minority), the District of Columbia (64.7 percent), California (60.3 percent), New Mexico (59.8 percent) and Texas (55.2 percent). No other state had a minority population greater than 46.4 percent of the total.

More than 11 percent (348) of the nation's 3,143 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2011, with nine of these counties achieving this status since April 1, 2010. Maverick, Texas, had the largest share (96.8 percent) of its population in minority groups, followed by Webb, Texas (96.4 percent) and Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska (96.2 percent).

The Nation Slowly Ages

There was a small uptick in the nation's median age, from 37.2 years in 2010 to 37.3 in 2011. The 65-and-older population increased from 40.3 million to 41.4 million over the period and included 5.7 million people 85 and older. Likewise, working-age adults (age 18 to 64) saw their numbers rise by about 2 million to 196.3 million in 2011. In contrast, the number of children under 18, 74.0 million in 2011, declined by about 200,000 over the period, largely because of the decline in high school-age children 14 to 17.

Maine had a higher median age than any other state (43.2), with Utah having the lowest median age (29.5). Florida had the highest percentage of its population 65 and older (17.6 percent), followed by Maine (16.3 percent). Utah had the highest percentage of its total population younger than 5 (9.3 percent).

Among counties, Sumter, Fla., was the nation's "oldest," with 45.5 percent of its population 65 and older, and Geary, Kan., was the nation's "youngest" (11.4 percent younger than 5).

Highlights for each race group and Hispanics at the national, state and county levels:

Hispanics

Blacks

Asians

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN)

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (NHPI)

Non-Hispanic White Alone

Unless otherwise specified, the statistics refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more races. Censuses and surveys permit respondents to select more than one race; consequently people may be one race or a combination of races. The detailed tables show statistics for the resident population by "race alone" and "race alone or in combination."

The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as separate and distinct concepts. In surveys and censuses, separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race. The question on Hispanic origin asks respondents if they are of Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin. Starting with the 2000 Census, the question on race asked respondents to report the race or races they consider themselves to be. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of "Some Other Race" from the 2010 Census are modified in these estimates. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this release versus those in the original 2010 Census data.

Detailed tables

State contacts

National: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/national/asrh/2011/index.html

State: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2011/index.html

County: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/asrh/2011/index.html

Puerto Rico Commonwealth: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/puerto_rico/asrh/2011/index.htm

Puerto Rico Municipio: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/municipios/asrh/2011/index.html

CB12-90

Robert Bernstein
Public Information Office
301-763-3030
e-mail: pio@census.gov

SOURCE U.S. Census Bureau

RELATED LINKS

http://www.census.gov

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